Sunday, 22 February 2009

Snowsales

The rather lovely independent publisher Snowbooks is now publishing details of sales and returns on its new(ish) Snowsales blog.

Do you want to know how many copies of each title Snowbooks sold in December? How many returns bookshops made the following month? Or which bookshops return copies of a book one day, only to reorder them again a few days later (and what the environmental and business implications of this silly shilly-shallying really are)? It's all there. Each blog post takes the form of an overview with a spreadsheet attached, which you can download and examine at your leisure

All you have to do to read all this fascinating stuff is email Emma Barnes and ask for a password, so she knows who has access to her sales information. You can find out everything you need to know here.

7 comments:

BuffySquirrel said...

I don't think I'm welcome in those quarters :D.

Jane Smith said...

I'm sorry to hear that, Buffy--but it might well be my fault and not yours.

That link should have taken you to a page where you're asked for your password if you want to read all the reports, with instructions on how to get one (you email Emma Barnes and she sends you one straight back because she Never Stops Working). Did you see something different? Could that be the problem? Or have you gone and eaten all of Snowbooks's acorns again and she's refusing to talk to you ever again?

Emma B said...

Buffy, don't be daft. Just because you have a terrible inability to tell a good book when you see one doesn't mean we can't be friends...

Seriously, email me. emma@snowbooks.com. You're more than welcome.

(for other readers: BuffyS once thought one of our books wasn't very good. Wrongly, of course.)

BuffySquirrel said...

No, Jane, it's definitely my fault! lol

Thanks, Emma :).

Jane Smith said...

See, I said that Emma Barnes never stops working: she found this thread before I'd had a chance to email her and tell her it was here.

behlerblog said...

which bookshops return copies of a book one day, only to reorder them again a few days later

Oh dear, you're speaking the choir here. It's not just bookstores who do this, but here in the US, it's the warehouse distributors. They do this because they don't want to actually *pay* for the books. They return the stock, then reorder so they can float the stock for another 90 days. Irritating as bees in my bloomers...

Jane Smith said...

Lynn, you really should ask Emma for a password to her sales blog. She talks about that there, too. If nothing else, it would be nice for you to know that you're not alone.